Monthly Archives: January 2012

Tweet withheld: (mis)understanding censorship on the Internet

Since Twitter announced its Country Withheld Content policy last Thursday, fear and outrage have spread at tweetspeed across the blogosphere and the connected media, with Reporters Without Borders director Olivier Basille firing off an open letter to Twitter’s chairman Jack Dorsey decrying the advent of “geolocative censorship” and a broad range of voices, from Egyptian […]

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Typecasting the digital humanities

The carnival of digital-humanities metacommentary takes a curious and compelling turn in Daniel Anderson‘s Waves, a screencasting remix of blog posts using captured keystrokes and cut-and-paste, text autocomplete, and a collage of videos. The piece features (very much inter alia) the interactive documentary and metaLAB touchstone Welcome to Pine Point and the text of a […]

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Exciting Spring courses by metaLAB friends

There are lots of very exciting courses be offerred around campus by friends with many overlapping concerns. In particular, these two studios in VES should be great: VES 45: “The New Photographers” by visiting artist Sue Johnson The Web and mobile technologies have opened up countless options for photographers to create and publish work, but […]

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DH baby steps and generative verse

In the midst of making my own initial forays into Python, I was fiddling around last night with a simple exercise: to make a script that grabs lines containing a given word from a source text and spits them into a new file. Veteran digital humanists will recognize this as a real kindergarten taskā€”but I […]

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Too Big to Know: David Weinberger on Scalable Knowledge

TOO BIG TO KNOW
David Weinberger, Berkman Center and Harvard Law School Library Innovation Lab
Tuesday, January 24, 6:00PM
Harvard Law School
RSVP required for those attending in person
Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library and the Office of the Senior Associate Provost at Harvard University
Reception to follow

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The Electric Information Age Book presentation

Presentation and discussion of The Electric Information Age Book with Jeffrey T. Schnapp at the Lauro De Bosis colloquium series, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, February 13, 2012. Location and time to be announced.

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At Nieman Lab: iPad, textbooks, and chimerical interactivity

I’ve just written a piece For Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Laboratory about the education-themed event Apple held yesterday at the Guggenheim Museum, where company execs debuted new textbook functionality for the iPad. In the Nieman post I argue that while Apple’s education initiative is aesthetically exciting, it may rely too heavily on the idea of interactivity […]

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Going dark: SOPA, Wikipedia, and expressive absence

The ostensible anti-piracy bills debated by Congress bear the hallmarks of an archaic politics: an atavism encoded in their very names, which combine duplicitous simplicity with the kind of doublespeak that flourished in the late twentieth century. SOPA is the acronym for the Stop Online Piracy Act, denominating a measure which as law would do […]

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Balloon mapping: unplugged, vernacular, mesoscale aerial photography

I’m loving the whole texture of the Balloon Mapping Kickstarter project from Open Hardware in Portland, OR: There’s so much going on here: the balloon as a spirited, low-tech hack; the integration with lightweight, elegantly-implemented software; the citizen science/civic media potential of the data (and appropriately, the nonprofit behind the balloon-kit project, Grassroots Mapping, enjoys […]

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Digital Humanities and the merry-go-round of metacommentary

At his own blog, game designer, critic, and Georgia Tech digital media professor Ian Bogost comments on the free-wheeling blog carnival that is the digital humanities (putting himself in the grip of an irony, as he entertainingly indicates). Having returned from MLA, Bogost gently, archly characterizes the roundelay of criticism, redefinition, and recrimination at the […]

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